Craighill Channel Lower Range Front Light

Craighill Channel Range Front Light

22 August 1885

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Location
Entrance to the Patapsco River, Chesapeake Bay, Maryland

Coordinates
39°11′19.01″N 76°23′39.84″W / 39.1886139°N 76.3944000°W / 39.1886139; -76.3944000Coordinates: 39°11′19.01″N 76°23′39.84″W / 39.1886139°N 76.3944000°W / 39.1886139; -76.3944000

Year first lit
1873 (temporary lights), completed 1875

Automated
1964

Foundation
Caisson with circular dwelling above.

Tower shape
Cylindrical

Markings / pattern
Brown with white roof

Focal height
25 feet (7.6 m)

Range
Red 6 nautical miles (11 km; 6.9 mi)

Characteristic
Flashing White, 3 sec with red sector

Fog signal
none

Admiralty number
J2246

ARLHS number
USA-198

USCG number

2-8040 [1] [2]

Craighill Channel Lower Range Front Light Station

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

Nearest city
Baltimore, Maryland

Area
less than one acre

Built
1873

MPS
Light Stations of the United States MPS

NRHP Reference #
02001420[3]

Added to NRHP
December 2, 2002

The Craighill Channel Lower Range Front Light, named for William Price Craighill, was the first caisson lighthouse built in the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland, USA. First lit in 1873, the range marks the first leg of the maintained Craighill Channel from the Chesapeake Bay at the mouth of the Patapsco River into the Baltimore harbor and works in conjunction with the Craighill Channel Lower Range Rear Light. It has been owned by non-profit organization Historical Place Preservation, Inc. since 2005.

Contents

1 History
2 Nomenclature
3 References
4 External links

History[edit]
This light was constructed in 1873 and is considered a greater feat of engineering than its predecessor, the Duxbury Light (the first caisson lighthouse, built in 1872), as it was built in deeper water under more difficult conditions. The caisson type quickly became the preferred type of lighthouse to be built in climates where ice floe damage was a possibility. The front range light is unusual for having two lights and is the only surviving example in the Chesapeake Bay. A beacon light is fixed above the gallery deck which serves as the front light for the range and a light in the lantern serves as a general aid to navigation.[4]
The station has never suffered ice damage despite it being located in a very exposed position; however the station was
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